It not a joke!!! It is the truth!!!

Giving people what they want: violence and sloppy eating

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Before it goes splat at the bottom
mini me + poo
lovingboth

My reading of fiction in book form fell off a cliff some time ago. I had the last but one Pratchett Discworld novel (Raising Steam) out from the library for months before reading it, and I still haven't looked for the last one. I'd borrowed the first two in the 'The Long Earths' series and returned them unread. I finished the last but two Christopher Brookmyre, Flesh Wounds, recently and will read the other one I've had out for months, Dead Girl Walking.

A few years ago, I'd have finished them on the first day.

In addition to those two, in the past year I have also read a couple of Len Deighton's – two of the first three 'Harry Palmer' books, The IPCRESS File and Billion Dollar Brain, doing them in a Monday morning shift in the bookshop. Annoyingly, someone bought Funeral in Berlin before I did that one.

But I have a horrible feeling that's it. And the Pratchett might have been earlier.

Other past likes have been Philip Reeve's work, particularly the 'Mortal Engines' series (although I don't think any of them have lived up to the first) and the silliness of the 'Larklight' series.

I liked the intelligence of all of them, and the relative shortness of the Deighton's. I can still do 'big books' in non-fiction, but it's been a long while since I've been tempted to put in the commitment needed for a story that takes more than a day to read. Probably the last one was the expanded version of American Gods, which means it was before moving here.

Any recommendations, preferably with what makes them good?

Update: I borrowed the last Pratchett today, along with his 'Poo' book.

The other author I've read almost all of is Christopher Priest, who would be a lot more famous if what he does so well wasn't labelled SF. The Prestige is my favourite and was obviously filmed in a way that lost much of the magic. What caused a pause in reading him is his last but two: The Islanders. It's an unreliable travel guide to a set of imaginary islands.

Apparently, if you can keep in your mind what was said about each where, and notice the inconsistencies, then you realise various things, but - argh - too much hard work without keeping notes. It's ok to use a computer to write a novel, but it's far less ok to have to use one to read it. Annoyingly, his latest is another set in the same islands. I'm going to give the one between those a read before attempting to read Islanders again.

Mirrored from my website's blog, The deranged mad of a brain man.

This entry was originally posted at http://lovingboth.dreamwidth.org/566609.html, because despite having a permanent account, I have had enough of LJ's current owners trying to be evil. Please comment there using OpenID - comment count unavailable have and if you have an LJ account, you can use it for your OpenID account. Or just join Dreamwidth! It only took a couple of minutes to copy all my entries here to there.

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I can't help greatly, my own reading having suffered a similarly precipitous fall in recent years. *sigh* Still, if you love sheer good writing, Kurt Vonnegut surely takes some beating.

If you're fine with comic suggestions as well, you could do much worse than Giant Days and Lumberjanes. And whilst it's not one for the dialogue, the plotting and characters in the webcomic Wapsi Square are quite noteworthy - but be warned, you'll need time, as it began in 2001, updating a few times a week, and the first main arc completed in 2009. =:) But what a hell of a ride that was, especially the climax! I'd absolutely recommend starting at the beginning, else you'll just be left confused by it all. It begins gently enough, as a simple slice of life strip set in Minneapolis, but then gently segues into a multi-layered storyline involving.. well, to begin with, some golems and an Aztec god of alcohol.


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